Departments > Planning & Development > South End Transportation Study

South End Transportation Study


Sign up for Study Updates HERE

Bath’s South End Transportation Study

Background:

The City of Bath is partnering with Bath Iron Works and the Maine Department of Transportation to find ways to reduce conflicts between vehicles and pedestrians in Bath’s South End neighborhood.

This transportation study is a response to changes in traffic patterns associated with the shipyard’s workforce, creating large volumes of vehicles coming and going, increasing pressures on parking, and contributing to vehicle speeds not in line with\pedestrian-friendly neighborhoods.

The study will focus on three key objectives: improving the safety of pedestrians, reducing the impact of vehicular traffic on neighborhood streets, and identifying strategies that will improve the availability of parking and/or reduce parking demand.

A significant number of pedestrians walk along the Washington Street corridor and between off-site BIW parking and the main productions area. This has led to conflicts between the needs of pedestrians and those of motor vehicles.

The need for more parking has been accelerated by new development in Bath’s Historic Downtown, as previous parking lots have transitioned into new uses.

Challenges:

Data will be collected to find methods to address the following challenges:

  • How can motor vehicle movements be made safer and more efficient? The study will assess potential changes in infrastructure and city policies.
  • What opportunities exist to create additional parking? ?
  • What is the best way to create a balance between neighborhoods and employee parking needs? ?

Public Input:

Hearing residents’ concerns and ideas is an important part of the study.

The first public meeting was held September 20 at Bath City Hall. This meeting will provide an opportunity to hear an overview of the study, air residents’ concerns and answer questions. Public Meeting Presentation  |  Public Meeting Notes from Sept 20 Meeting

A second public meeting will take place on December 13th at 6pm in the City Hall Auditorium.

Residents who would like to receive email updates and meeting notices can sign up here.

Study Data:

Not everyone is familiar with the information needed to identify solutions in a transportation study. Below are examples of data that will be gathered and updated:

  • Intersection turning movement counts
  • Traffic counts
  • Bicycle and pedestrian volumes
  • Truck volumes and patterns
  • Geometric roadway conditions including width
  • Transit and BIW vans and buses
  • On and off street parking supply and regulations
  • Current business types and other non-single family uses and their locations
  • Seasonal traffic volume information
  • Public right of way information
  • Speed data
  • Crash data for the most recent three-year period
  • Parking capacity in areas not identified by parking signage
  • Regulatory signage and pavement markings
  • Sidewalks and crosswalks (including ADA compliance, material, condition and width)
  • Bicycle facilities
  • Traffic signal equipment, phasing and timing