Bowdoin Interns Help City of Bath Update Climate Action Plan, Comprehensive Plan

Date: August 22, 2019
Location:
55 Front St.
Bath, Maine 04530

Media Contact: Lindsey Goudreau at 207-443-8330 or lgoudreau@cityofbath.com

Bath, ME (August 22, 2019) – For the past several months, Emma Kyzivat and Noah Eckstein, both rising Juniors at Bowdoin College, interned with Bath City Hall to help the City update its Climate Action and Comprehensive Plan. Kyzivat interned through the Bowdoin College Environmental Studies Fellowship Program and Eckstein through the Margaret Chase Smith Policy Center’s Maine Government Summer Internship Program.

At the last City Council meeting on August 7, Kyzivat and Eckstein reported their findings to Bath Councilors and the public.

Kyzivat had the task of updating City’s greenhouse gas emissions inventory and Climate Action Plan, which was last updated in 2008 by another Bowdoin Intern.

“My day-to-day work has been a lot of contacting (local and state agencies) to bring in data regarding electricity and fuel usage within the City of Bath, and anything else that would release greenhouse gas emissions,” Kyzivat explained to City Council. 

In the City’s 2007 emissions report, the City established a goal of reducing municipal emissions by 2% each year, for a 20% reduction by 2017. Kyzivat found that the City not only achieved but exceeded that goal, ultimately reducing emissions by 27%. Contributing factors to this reduction include the City’s stormwater separation project (which reduces energy spent on water treatment by separating rain water from sewer refuse), increased emphasis on composting, the conversion of several City buildings to natural gas fuel, and the widespread adoption of LED lights.

Kyzivat said that the City’s largest contributor of greenhouse gases is the Bath landfill, and that climate action goals for the future should include a plan to limit waste entering the facility.

Kyzivat’s emissions report and Climate Action Plan will be released in the next 6 - 12 months with the City’s updated Comprehensive Plan, which Eckstein, working out of the City Planner’s Office, collected data for during his internship. His research will provide the groundwork necessary for the City to discuss its strategic goals for the future. In addition to research and data collection, Eckstein also created several ArcGIS maps which provide interactive illustrations of data sets (like land parcels enrolled in current use tax programs) and will be used in the City Planner’s Office moving forward. 

When asked by Councilor Susan Bauer whether his internship encouraged him about work in the municipal sector, Eckstein replied: “It’s been encouraging for sure. I’ve been interested in government of all levels – municipal, state, federal, international affairs- for as long as I can remember, so this has been a really cool way to dive right in on a local level and see how things are done. I have a much greater appreciation for the kind of work that (the City Planner) does.”

City Council Chairwoman Mari Eosco thanked Kyzivat and Eckstein for their work, saying: “You are impressive, impressive young people and I’m excited that you’re going out into the world to make it better.”