Departments > Planning & Development > Richardson & Western Traffic Calming

Richardson & Western Traffic Calming

In 2016, residents of Richardson Street approached City Councilors about speeding and excessive volumes in their neighborhood. After initial study and first-tier traffic calming approaches, City Staff, working with the Transportation Committee, have proceeded with a comprehensive planning process to enhance the quality of life in the neighborhood using Traffic Calming techniques.

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What is Traffic Calming?

Traffic calming slows traffic and creates safer and more comfortable streets. There are a variety of measures that can be applied together to address “cut-through” traffic, speeding and generally improve neighborhood streets for local residents and visitors.

Depending on the neighborhood, the design measure used may look and feel slightly different. Some possible traffic calming measures can include street design elements like:

  • Speed humps & Raised Crosswalks
  • Pavement Markings & Signage
  • Visible Crosswalks and Pedestrian Islands
  • Traffic Circles  
  • Traffic diverters (concrete elements that allow bicycles and pedestrians to pass freely but divert car traffic to other routes) Forced turns for vehicles or turn prohibitions for vehicles to reduce “cut-through” traffic
  • Bicycle facilities

Project Background & Chronology

Following a speed and volume study conducted by the Bath VIPS in 2016,  the City painted edge lines (also known as fog or gore lines) on Richardson Street, as a preliminary and cost-effective approach to slow speeds.  Subsequent to a second speed and volume study in 2017, the City engaged Gorrill-Palmer Consulting Engineers to produce a conceptual-level plan of traffic calming devices within the neighborhood.

During Summer 2018, the preferred traffic calming concept and the selected techniques will be tested using temporary devices--items like temporary bollards, 'bolt-able' speed humps, and construction barrels.  After the summer season concludes, the Transportation Committee will evaluate the project and determine what future steps the City will take.  Future actions could be permanently installing devices, revising the types of devices, or not pursuing additional implementation.

Do you live or work in the neighborhood?  Do you use these streets for your daily commute?  If you have thoughts, questions, comments, or ideas you'd like to share, please contact Andrew Deci, Director of Planning & Development at adeci@cityofbath.com.  

Chronology

Summer 2017 - Edgelines added to Richardson Street

December 13, 2017 - Public Meeting to Understand Neighborhood Concerns

Postcards sent to the neighborhood (apx 60); about ten households were represented

March 14, 2018 - Public Meeting to Receive Feedback on Concepts (G-P Presentation Available at the Link)

Postcards sent to the neighborhood (apx 70) about six households were represented

3/20/2018 Coastal Journal Article

March 28, 2018 - Transportation Committee Review of Concepts 

April 2018 - Transportation Committee Selection of Preferred Concept

Summer 2018 - Installation of Temporary Traffic Calming Treatments

Fall 2018 - Public Meeting to Evaluate Effectiveness of Traffic Calming Treatments 

Fall 2018 - Transportation Committee Recommendation for Future Implementation/